OUR FABRICS

One of the most common materials used in the making of clothes, cotton's usefulness comes down to its durability as well as its comfort. It's so common in fact that as you read this, you're very likely to be wearing more than one item made of cotton.

Comfortable. When absorbed from the surrounding atmosphere, cotton has a moisture content of 8-10% that makes it feel soft and pliable. As humidity and temperature increase, moisture in the fabric evaporates quickly to maintain a comfortable balance.

Warm. Cotton is naturally a very low-level conductor of electricity and heat, and the porous, flexible material has many gaps that trap and accumulate air to make it effective thermal insulation.

Durable. Cotton is very resistant to normal wear and tear and last for years even with frequent machine washing and drying. Cotton is also naturally resistant to alkali, which is found in most detergents, and is largely unaffected by printing and dyeing.

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People have been using wool to make clothing for thousands of years, and its easy to figure out why: compared to most clothing materials, its a fantastic insulator against cold as well as breathable enough to bve woven into summer garments. Additionally, it's naturally wrinkle-resistant and supremely versatile in how it can be prepared and presented.

Warm & Dry. Due to the natural curl of wool fibers, it traps a lot of non-flowing air in the fabric, acting as a fantastic thermal barrier that protects against cold. Wool is naturally hygroscopic and keeps your skin dry by regulating moisture, making it a great summer clothing fabric.

Natural & Renewable. Sheep grow a new coat of wool annually, and grows back year after year for a sustainable supply of material. What's more is that wool is also 100% biodegradable to leave a greatly reduced environmental impact.

Hypoallergenic. Wool is naturally resistant to bacteria, mold and mildew. It also is a poor conductor of static electricity and attracts less dust and particulate matter than other materials and poses less of a reaction risk to allergy sufferers.

Durable. Wool fibers have a natural crimp that allows it to keep its shape after being stretched by up to 30%. With proper care, any wool clothing item can last for decades of wear.

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There's nothing quite like the feel of cashmere against your skin. This precious material comes from fine wool that grows under a cashmere goat's thicker, coarser coat that grows as insualtion for the winter months before it sheds in the spring. Cashmere is up to 8 times warmer than wool, and its scarcity (it makes up roughly 0.2% of animal fiber production annually) is what makes it a sought-after material.

Soft & Warm. Cashmere fibers are amongst the finest fibers and each one -- at the microscopic level -- features small scales and an air layer that lends them their super soft texture. The extra-tight weave that is possible with cashmere makes it a fantastic heat retainer.

Lightweight & Adaptable. Cashmere clothing can be woven very thin while still mantaining very effective insulation to keep the wearer warm, and this adaptability lends cashmere to an almost endless amount of styles

Eye-popping Colors. Cashmere fibers are very absorbitant of moisture, meaning they fully absorb dyes for deep, rich colors that last a long time.

Ultra-pliable. Each cashmere fiber has a number of little crimps and curves that naturally recover their original shape after being straightened. This makes cashmere a very resilient material that retains shape after wear and resists shrinkage from washing.

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Beneath a layer of rough black hair on the necks of Tibetan yaks, there is a thick, extremely precious layer of brown fluff that herders call ‘Khullu’, which helps protect the yaks from the cold. In spring, they shed this layer of Khullu which traditionally would be used to make any number of simple daily necessities. Now though, it provides Tibetan herders with a stable income for their way of life as yak fiber is found in luxury fashion collections on runways worldwide.

Warm & Dry. Yak fiber is as warm as wool and as soft as cashmere. Wear it during winter and it's a great insulator against the cold; during summer, it wicks away moisture due to its good breathability.

Hypoallergenic. Wool is naturally resistant to bacteria, mold and mildew. It's also a poor conductor of static electricity, meaning it attracts less dust and particulate matter than other materials and poses less of a reaction risk to allergy sufferers.

Durable. Yak fiber wool is remarkably stretchy and moves as you move, then returns to its original shape.

Natural & Renewable. Yaks grow a new coat of fine wool annually, which is combed off and regrows the next winter -- a sustainable supply of material. What's more is that yak fiber wool is 100% biodegradable to leave a greatly reduced environmental impact.

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Alpaca fur, simply referred to as alpaca, is akin to a camel hair fiber. It is softer and finer than mohair or cashmere, yet stronger and provides more thermal protection than wool. Alpaca fur harvesting is growing in popularity due to its similarity to other premium fibers currently available as well as its comparatively reduced environmental impact. 

Rich Natural Colors. Alpacas come in a wide array of colors, and as of this writing, colorology experts have identified 22 colors that occur naturally in alpaca fur.

Warm & Dry. The comfort and warmth of alpaca fur is matched by its breathabiity -- you can stay warm wearing an item made from alpaca, and if you start to sweat, it will naturally wick away moisture.

Natural & Renewable. Alpacas grow a new coat annually, which is sheared off to regrow the next winter, meaning that they are a sustainable supply of material. What's more is that alpaca fur is 100% biodegradable to leave a greatly reduced environmental impact.

Hypoallergenic. Alpaca is naturally resistant to bacteria, mold and mildew. It also is a poor conductor of static electricity and attracts less dust and particulate matter than other materials, posing less of a reaction risk to allergy sufferers.

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